FAQs

From the first diagnosis of a terminal illness palliative care can begin. You and your family can begin palliative care when you need and want support. Your needs might change as the disease stabilises and palliative care services might be reduced or stopped until further needs arise.

Palliative care can be provided by a number of different health professionals, depending on:

  • The needs of the patient
  • The resources and needs of the family and carers.

Many health professionals may be involved in delivering palliative care and generally they will work as part of an interdisciplinary team. A palliative care team may include:

  • General practitioners
  • Specialist palliative care doctors and nurses
  • Specialist doctors-oncologists, cardiologists, neurologists, respiratory physicians, geriatricians, surgeons
  • Nurses
  • Allied health professionals-pharmacists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists
  • Social workers
  • Grief and bereavement counsellors
  • Pastoral care workers
  • Volunteers

You can contact the palliative care service in your area directly or through a health care professional. Your GP or hospital doctor may talk to you about palliative care as one option for ongoing professional care and support. With your permission your health care professional may refer you to a specialist palliative care service.

You can find your local palliative care provider here.

Care can be provided:

  • at home
  • in a hospital
  • in an aged care home
  • in a hospice

Most people with a terminal condition prefer to receive treatment at home, but this will depend on many factors, including:

  • the nature of the illness
  • how much support is available from the person’s family and community
  • whether the person has someone who can care for them.

Visit our resources page to find useful link for education, support and other relevant organisations.

From the first diagnosis of a terminal illness palliative care can begin. You and your family can begin palliative care when you need and want support. Your needs might change as the disease stabilises and palliative care services might be reduced or stopped until further needs arise.

Palliative care can be provided by a number of different health professionals, depending on:

  • The needs of the patient
  • The resources and needs of the family and carers.

Many health professionals may be involved in delivering palliative care and generally they will work as part of an interdisciplinary team. A palliative care team may include:

  • General practitioners
  • Specialist palliative care doctors and nurses
  • Specialist doctors-oncologists, cardiologists, neurologists, respiratory physicians, geriatricians, surgeons
  • Nurses
  • Allied health professionals-pharmacists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists
  • Social workers
  • Grief and bereavement counsellors
  • Pastoral care workers
  • Volunteers

You can contact the palliative care service in your area directly or through a health care professional. Your GP or hospital doctor may talk to you about palliative care as one option for ongoing professional care and support. With your permission your health care professional may refer you to a specialist palliative care service.

You can find your local palliative care provider here.

Care can be provided:

  • at home
  • in a hospital
  • in an aged care home
  • in a hospice

Most people with a terminal condition prefer to receive treatment at home, but this will depend on many factors, including:

  • the nature of the illness
  • how much support is available from the person’s family and community
  • whether the person has someone who can care for them.

Visit our resources page to find useful link for education, support and other relevant organisations.

From the first diagnosis of a terminal illness palliative care can begin. You and your family can begin palliative care when you need and want support. Your needs might change as the disease stabilises and palliative care services might be reduced or stopped until further needs arise.

Palliative care can be provided by a number of different health professionals, depending on:

  • The needs of the patient
  • The resources and needs of the family and carers.

Many health professionals may be involved in delivering palliative care and generally they will work as part of an interdisciplinary team. A palliative care team may include:

  • General practitioners
  • Specialist palliative care doctors and nurses
  • Specialist doctors-oncologists, cardiologists, neurologists, respiratory physicians, geriatricians, surgeons
  • Nurses
  • Allied health professionals-pharmacists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists
  • Social workers
  • Grief and bereavement counsellors
  • Pastoral care workers
  • Volunteers

You can contact the palliative care service in your area directly or through a health care professional. Your GP or hospital doctor may talk to you about palliative care as one option for ongoing professional care and support. With your permission your health care professional may refer you to a specialist palliative care service.

You can find your local palliative care provider here.

Care can be provided:

  • at home
  • in a hospital
  • in an aged care home
  • in a hospice

Most people with a terminal condition prefer to receive treatment at home, but this will depend on many factors, including:

  • the nature of the illness
  • how much support is available from the person’s family and community
  • whether the person has someone who can care for them.

Visit our resources page to find useful link for education, support and other relevant organisations.